Cambodia Travel


Politics and government
June 3, 2009, 1:35 pm
Filed under: Blogging, Cambodia, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Travel, Trip, Vacation

The politics of Cambodia formally take place, according to the nation’s constitution of 1993, in the framework of a constitutional monarchy operated as a parliamentary representative democracy. The Prime Minister of Cambodia is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system, while the king is the head of state. The Prime Minister is appointed by the King, on the advice and with the approval of the National Assembly; the Prime Minister and his or her ministerial appointees exercise executive power in government. Legislative power is vested in both the executive and the two chambers of parliament, the National Assembly of Cambodia and the Senate. On October 14, 2004, King Norodom Sihamoni was selected by a special nine-member throne council, part of a selection process that was quickly put in place after the surprise abdication of King Norodom Sihanouk a week before. Sihamoni’s selection was endorsed by Prime Minister Hun Sen and National Assembly Speaker Prince Norodom Ranariddh (the king’s half brother and current chief advisor), both members of the throne council. He was crowned in Phnom Penh on October 29, 2004.

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Phnom Penh
January 29, 2009, 2:56 pm
Filed under: Blogging, Cambodia, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Travel, Trip, Vacation

Phnom Penh- the capital of Cambodia, located in south-western part of the country, at the mouth of the river Tonle Sap to Mekongu.2, 0 million inhabitants (2006).

Leading industrial and scientific center – cultural country. The establishments of the food (rice mills, breweries, sugar, oil mills, fish processing, the tobacco industry), wood, textile, metal and elektromaszynowego (construction of the boat, the assembly of tractors, the automotive industry). A number of artistic craftsmanship (products of silver and ivory).

A large river port accessible to small vessels at sea. International airport (Pochentong). Road junction, railway station on the route of Ho Chi Minh City – Bangkok. The combination of a rail line and by car from the main sea port of Kompong So



The bamboo railway
December 8, 2008, 4:42 pm
Filed under: Blogging, Cambodia, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Travel, Trip, Vacation

The bamboo railway as it is known to overseas visitors, “nori” or ” “lorries” as it is known to locals is a popular form of transport in the North west of the country near Battambang. The trains consist of a bamboo-covered platform and two detached axles with wheels. They run on regular tracks and are powered with Briggs & Stratton type air-cooled gasoline engines, adapted from portable electricity generators. Power is transmitted by belt and pulley. Trains can reach up to 40 km/h. When meeting traffic in the opposite direction, passengers are expected to lift the platform and axles off the tracks to let the other “train” pass



Cambodia – Guide with tips for your holiday
October 9, 2008, 6:43 pm
Filed under: Blogging, Cambodia, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Travel, Trip, Vacation
In Cambodia, there is tropical monsoon climate. The southwest monsoon brings the rainy season from May to October the Luvseiten the mountains up to 4 000 mm annual precipitation, in the central lowlands are the values between 1 000 and 2 000 millimeters. From November to April is the country under the influence of a dry northeast monsoon. The average annual temperature is in Phnom Penh at 26.7 ° C, the seasonal temperature fluctuations are low.

Around 52.9 percent of Cambodia’s land area is forested (2000). The densest forests are found in the mountains and on the southwest coast. There are rainforest and monsoon forests that grow in coastal mangroves. Many of the Mangrovendickichte responsible for the biodiversity as well as for the fisheries of existential importance, however, were destroyed. On the high plains and plateaus dominated savanna with high grasses. Rubber trees, Kapokbäume, palms, coconut palms and banana trees are widespread.

The advancing deforestation is the biggest environmental problem. In the sixties and seventies of the 20th Century was attended by large parts of forests and wetlands by the bombing and the Vietnam War defoliant used damage. In the seventies and eighties, was destroyed by the disastrous agricultural economy of the Khmer Rouge and the civil war continued. As in the nineties einkehrte peace in the country, the export of tropical timber industry is an important factor for Cambodia. The annual deforestation is 0.6 percent (1990-2000). The Cambodian government has 15.8 percent (2000) of the total land area under protection.

For diverse wildlife includes large mammals such as tigers, leopards, Malaienbären, elephants, Muntjaks, hog deer, Koupreys, Banteng and yak. In the bird world found cormorants, purple herons, Schwarzmilane, narrow beak vultures, pheasants and prelate Bankivahühner (Stammart our chicken house). Turtles are reptiles, Agamas (including the gliding flight enabled dragon), Skink and snakes like cobras represents.

Around 92 percent of Cambodians are members of the Khmervolkes. The rest of the population consists primarily of the minority groups of Chinese, Vietnamese and Thai and from the countries in the mountain resident Cham, Moi and Lao. The majority of the population lives in rural areas (81.8 percent), degree of urbanization is very low.

Cambodia has about 13.36 million inhabitants (2004) and a population density of 76 inhabitants per square kilometers at an average annual growth rate of 1.8 percent. The average life expectancy is 58.4 years (men 55.7 years and women 61.2 years; 2004). During the terror reign of the Khmer Rouge died from 1975 to 1979 at least 10 percent of the population.

The capital, Phnom Penh (about 999 800 inhabitants) is located at the confluence of the Mekong and Tonle Sap. Other major cities are Battambang (793 000), Siĕmréab (76 000), Kampong Cham (33 000), Prey Veng and Kampot (15 000). The most important seaport is Kampong SAOM (16 000), formerly Sihanoukville on the Gulf of Thailand. End of the seventies, the population of the larger cities, as the inhabitants either fled or in rural areas have been relocated.

The official language is Khmer, which is one of the Mon-Khmer languages counts, a branch of the Austro Asiatic language family. French takes place as trade, education and transport language use, meanwhile wins English is becoming increasingly important. Minority languages are Chinese and Vietnamese.



Geography
August 23, 2008, 5:01 pm
Filed under: Blogging, Cambodia, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Travel, Trip, Vacation

Cambodia has an area of 181,035 square kilometres (69,898 sq mi), sharing an 800 kilometre (500 mi) border with Thailand in the north and west, a 541 kilometre (336 mi) border with Laos in the northeast, and a 1,228 kilometre (763 mi) border with Vietnam in the east and southeast.

It has 443 kilometres (275 mi) of coastline along the Gulf of Thailand.



Phnom Sontuk
June 18, 2008, 1:38 pm
Filed under: Blogging, Cambodia, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Travel, Trip, Vacation

Phnom Sontuk is the most important holy mountain in Cambodia’s northwest and the hillside is decorated with images of Buddha and a series of pagodas. It’s set high above the surrounding countryside, meaning there are a lot of stairs to climb – 980 in fact. They wind their way up through a forest and emerge at a colourful pagoda with many small shrines.

There are a number of interesting sandstone boulders balanced around the wat (temple), into which images of Buddha have been carved. Just beneath the southern summit of the mountain are several large reclining Buddhas – some modern incarnations cast in cement, others carved into the mountain itself centuries ago. There is an active wat on the mountain and the local monks are always interested in receiving foreign tourists.



When to Go
May 14, 2008, 10:16 am
Filed under: Blogging, Cambodia, Culture, Guide, Nature, Photo, Photography, Photos, Pictures, Travel, Trip, Vacation

The ideal months to be in Cambodia are December and January, when humidity is bearable, temperatures are cooler and it’s unlikely to rain. From early February temperatures start to rise until the killer month, April, when temperatures often exceed 40°C (104°F). Come May and June, the southwestern monsoon brings rain and high humidity, cooking up a sweat for all but the hardiest of visitors.

The wet season (May-Oct), though very soggy, can be a good time to visit Angkor, as the moats will be full and the foliage lush – but steer clear of the northeast regions during those months, as the going gets pretty tough when the tracks are waterlogged.

The country’s biggest festival, Bon Om Tuk, is held in early November, and is well worth catching. Others you might like to plan around include the water festival in Phnom Penh, or Khmer New Year.